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The chainsaw has been around for more than a century ( 1 ). In that time it’s become an invaluable tool for landscapers, homeowners, construction companies and of course, the modern lumberjack. They allow for the fast, effective clearing of trees for roadwork, home construction and more.

Ranking The 10 Best Chainsaws of 2020

Ranking The 10 Best Chainsaws of 2020The chainsaw has been around for more than a century ( 1 ). In that time it’s become an invaluable tool for landscapers, homeowners, construction companies and of course, the modern lumberjack. They allow for the fast, effective clearing of trees for roadwork, home construction and more. They enable landscapers to prune in a quick, effective manner. They take the toil out of the preparation of firewood and they make the entire timber industry possible. They’re simple in concept, compact in design and affordably priced. And without them storm restoration would be a much more difficult process. Below, we’ve brought together the 10 best chainsaws currently on the market for your consideration. 1. Husqvarna 450 Gas Powered Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price We start our tour of the 10 best chainsaws with this 18 inch gas-powered beauty from Husqvarna. The 450 is small enough to take care of things like firewood and pruning but large enough to clear mid-sized trees with little effort. It’s relatively light at 11.3 pounds but has a powerful 50cc engine that takes no prisoners. When all that power is channeled through the 18 inch guide bar not much is going to stop it. There’s a ton of torque, but because of the LowVib dampening system, very little vibration ( 2 ). The 450 features a low emissions engine, integrated chain brake and built in chain catcher to prevent injury in the event of a broken or derailed chain. Comes with a standard 2 year warranty that can be extended to 4 years. 2. Makita XCU03PT1 Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price Makita understands that battery powered chainsaws come with a built in disadvantage: when the battery dies your chainsaw is useless. So they take the approach that “more is better”. And in this case they’re exactly right. While this is sometimes referred to as a “kit” it’s actually just the company’s excellent XCU03PT1 Chainsaw and 4 – yup, 4 – lithium-ion batteries, each of which takes about 45 minutes to recharge from empty. That means that, as long as you’re working somewhere with power outlets, you’ll never have to worry about running out of battery power. The saw itself has a 14 inch guide bar which makes it a nice tool for landscapers and homeowners. It’s also light and provides power equivalent to a 32cc gas engine. Not bad for a battery job. 3. Husqvarna 460 24-Inch Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Husqvarna 460 is the big brother of the company’s outstanding 450 that we looked at above. It features a 24 inch guide bar and a slightly larger 60cc gas powered motor to handle both the increased chain weight and whatever it is you’re cutting with this beast. In addition, there’s a centrifugal air cleaning system that keeps big pieces of debris away from the air filter. And you get 3 chains with your purchase. The 460 boasts outstanding torque ( 3 ) at every speed. It’s beautifully balanced to reduce wear and tear on your arms and shoulders. And while it’s a bit heavier than the 450 it’s also an alpha dog that isn’t backing down from the toughest job. 4. Poulan Pro PP4218A Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Poulan Pro PP4218A is a lightweight but aggressive chainsaw that’s easy on you and tough on wood. It features a 42cc 2-cycle gas engine, an 18 inch guide bar and a quick start system that takes much of the drudgery out of working with a gas engine saw. It also features what the company calls their “Super Clean Air Filtration” system that reduces much of the noxious debris that typically emanates from a gas saw. And it comes with an extra chain, gloves and a nifty carrying case. Landscapers with lots of wooded properties on their circuit will love this saw. It’s nimble enough for pruning and serious enough for all but the biggest trees. The 2 year warranty is a nice layer of icing on the cake. 5. Makita XCU02Z Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price If you’re looking for a tough but compact and convenient chain saw to handle the occasional job on your wooded lot, here it is. Landscaping companies are going to want to have one of these on hand as well for quick pruning jobs. And if you have a wood burning stove it will save you from long sessions at the chopping block. The guide bar here is a modest 12 inches, which is actually perfect for light projects. It’s also a good size for people with little or no experience with a chain saw. The fact that it only produces 89 decibels makes it very neighbor-friendly. While the auto oiler and integrated chain brake make it both low maintenance and safe to operate. 6. WORX WG304.1 Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Worx WG304.1 is an outstanding value for those who might need a chainsaw for occasional light duty. This is a corded chainsaw which means you’ll be limited in as far as where you can use it. But if you just need something for around the yard or for firewood prep it’s a solid choice. The 18 inch guide bar means it’s big enough for small trees, pruning and the aforementioned firewood. And the fact that it’s a fairly svelte 11 pounds means it’s not going to destroy your forearms to work with it over the course of an afternoon. The WG304.1 features built in chain brake, automatic oil lubrication and a patented auto-tensioning system that takes the guesswork out of chain adjustments. It’s ready to use right out of the box and there’s a 3 year warranty just for good measure. 7. Remington RM1425 Limb N’ Trim Corded Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The name really says it all with this chainsaw. It’s perfect for light projects around the property including pruning limbs and trimming back those shade tree branches. It weighs a very forearm-friendly 6.25 pounds, has a 14 inch chain and starts up dependably with the push of a button. There’s auto-lube, an auto-tensioner and an 8 amp motor that won’t bring down old growth forest but is ideal for the aforementioned trimming projects. You can even take care of your firewood prep. Although you’ll need to make sure you have a backup battery at the ready. Light, affordable and easy to use it’s ideal for the homeowner who likes to work in the yard. 8. Makita UC4051A 16″ Electric Chain Saw Click Here for the Lowest Price The UC4051A from Makita is a step up from the "Limb N’ Trim" . Which makes it a good choice for landscapers or homeowners who need to cut lots of firewood. Or who have lots of trees within spitting distance of the house. The 16 inch guide bar lets it take on medium sized trees and because it’s beautifully balanced it’s not going to turn your arms to jelly after 20 minutes. The 14.5 amp motor gets the chain spinning at an impressive 2900 FPM. While the integrated limiter prevents the user from burning the motor out. There’s auto-oiling, comfortable grips, built-in chain brake for added safety and tool-less chain adjustment. If you live in the country you should have one. 9. ECHO CCS-58VBT Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The Echo CCS-58VBT Cordless Chainsaw will accept a 16, 18 or 20 inch guide bar. That makes it one of the most versatile mid-level chainsaws out there. It’s also one of the lightest for its size, weighing in at a very modest 11.2 pounds. And it’s feature rich with its side access tensioner, automatic oiler, highly effective exhaust system and integrated chain break. It does a great job speeding up firewood prep and landscapers will find themselves reaching for it again and again. The CCS-58VBT also boasts an effective vibration reduction system that saves your arms and extends the life of the saw in the process. And let’s not forget the industry best 5-year warranty. 10. Black+Decker LCS 1240 Cordless Chainsaw Click Here for the Lowest Price The last item on our list of best chainsaws comes to us from Black+Decker. Their LCS 1240 sports a modest 12 inch guide bar and a 40 volt lithium-ion battery that’s good for 50 minutes or 60 cuts, whichever comes first. It’s really light at just 8.3 pounds and it feels even lighter because it’s so well-balanced. There’s auto-oiling, tool-less tensioning and a wrap around handle that’s extremely comfortable and makes handling a breeze. With its modest price and dependable performance it’s a value winner. FAQs Corded, Gas Powered or Battery Powered? When it comes to chainsaws you have 3 power options: gas-powered, corded and battery powered. Each has their advantages and disadvantages and which one you choose will depend largely on the circumstances of their use. That is, what you intend to cut, how much of it there is to cut and where the cutting will likely happen. Let’s take a closer look at the 3 power options now. Gas – Gas powered chainsaws may require a bit of effort to start but once they’re powered up there isn’t much they can’t cut. They’re typically more powerful than electric powered chainsaws and, as long as you have enough gas with you, they’ll go wherever the wood is. In most cases you should get around an hour of continuous operation on a tank of gas. Sometimes more, sometimes a little less. But the term “gas-powered” is a bit deceptive, since they actually run on a gas/oil mixture ( 4 ) you either have to buy or prepare yourself. Gas-Powered Pros No limit to their portability Still the most powerful option Only limit is the amount of gas you have with you Gas-Powered Cons They pump out a lot of exhaust If you run out of the gas/oil mix you’re out of luck Starting them can be a chore Corded – A corded chainsaw runs on electricity supplied by a power cord. That obviously implies that if you don’t have an outlet handy you’re out of luck. Guys harvesting trees don’t typically have the luxury of having an outlet nearby. So for them, the corded chainsaw is typically a non-starter. Nonetheless, there are still plenty of reasons someone may want a corded chainsaw. For instance, landscape companies almost always have one on hand. And people whose homes are on wooded lots will also likely find plenty of use for a corded chainsaw. Corded Pros No noxious exhaust to deal with They’re typically much quieter than gas powered models They also typically require less maintenance No batteries to die or gas mixtures to buy Corded Cons Not much use to commercial loggers They don’t have the power of a gas model You can’t use just any extension cord ( 5 ) Battery-Powered – The battery powered chainsaw garnered plenty of snickers when it first hit the market. But few people are laughing today. Both available power and battery life have been greatly increased in recent years making them a viable alternative to corded chainsaws in some cases. Although they still aren’t powerful enough to appeal to hard-core loggers. For the most part they’re a nice tool for the homeowner or the landscaper to have on hand for occasional use. Battery-Powered Pros Extremely portable Typically the lightest type of chainsaw Start in an instant and very quiet Battery-Powered Cons The weakest of the 3 power options Batteries tend to run down pretty quick You have to remember to always have a spare battery charged and ready When it comes to power options the choice you make will be driven in large part by how you plan to use the chainsaw. If you envision cutting large trunks in remote locations it’s gas power all the way. If you run a landscaping company, use the chainsaw regularly but have ready access to power outlets on your clients’ homes then corded is a good choice. If you want it just to clear brush in the yard and maybe do some pruning now and then a battery powered chainsaw should fit the bill. How Long Should the Guide Bar Be? A chainsaw isn’t much without a guide bar. And the length of the guide bar is one of the most important considerations when selecting a chainsaw. As a general rule the longer the guide bar the more power you’ll want from your motor. Simply because longer chains are heavier. The length of the guide bar will be driven by the intended use of the chain saw. If it’s too short you may find yourself unable to perform your duties. If it’s too long it can be a safety hazard when cutting small objects. Guide bars tend to vary in length from about 8 inches to as much as 30 inches. (Some guide bars commercial loggers use can be longer than that.) The super short guide bars are used almost exclusively for light work such as pruning. Most guide bars however, tend to be in the 16 to 24 inch range. Here are some things that should help you choose the right length. 16 to 20 Inch Guide Bars – 16 to 20 inch guide bars are considered mid-level. They’ll cut plenty of wood as long as it’s not too thick. This size guide bar is considered the outer limits of what’s practical for pruning and small scale work. But they’re fine for cutting firewood and storm cleanup. If you have little or no experience with a chainsaw this size may be a bit much to learn on. We’d recommend starting smaller and working your way up. 16 to 20 Inch Pros Can handle bigger jobs with relative ease No problem cutting down mid-size trees Good for cutting firewood 16 to 20 Inch Cons May be too big for beginners Too big for finesse work Requires a bigger motor and more power 20 to 24 "Inch Guide Bars" Once you get past 20 inches you’re talking about the kind of lengths professionals rely on. A 24 inch chainsaw can cut 95% of the trees on planet earth and do so without breaking too much of a sweat. And for the record, you’re also talking gas chainsaws with lots of power that can make use of that long chain. That said, few are the situations where a homeowner – or even a landscaper for that matter – will need anything longer than a 20 inch guide bar. 20 to 24 Inch Pros The ability to take down any size tree in your path Saves your forearms a lot of work Enables you to keep moving 20 to 24 Inch Cons Too big for around the house Dangerous for inexperienced users Adds a lot of weight to the chainsaw As we mentioned earlier you can find 30 inch or even bigger guide bars. But anything that large is really a specialty item and not intended for everyday use. What Safety Features are Available? Chainsaws are extremely dangerous tools that can yield deadly consequences if not handled properly. Chainsaw manufacturers are not blind to the risks involved and have worked diligently to make these tools as safe as can be. That includes integrating certain safety features, including: The Chain Brake – The chain brake is an incredibly important safety feature designed to bring the rotating chain to a quick stop should it be necessary. There are typically two ways the chain brake is activated. The first is by pushing the top handle forward should you feel the need to stop the chain for whatever reason. In such cases the chain will usually come to a complete stop in less than a second. The other way the chain brake is engaged is during a kickback event ( 6 ). This type of emergency braking is crucial in order to stave off serious injury should the operator’s hand become dislodged during a violent kickback. The Chain Catcher – When a chain breaks there is always the risk it may fly back toward the operator. To prevent this from happening most saws offer a chain catcher that stops the chain from flying away in the event it breaks or becomes derailed. The process can be loud and jarring but it’s also effective at preventing serious injury. The Safety Throttle – The safety throttle is designed to prevent the chain from being accidentally activated should something hit the trigger. It usually takes the form of a second trigger located on the chainsaw’s rear handle. This dual trigger design might seem like overkill, but if you’re operating in heavy underbrush it could save your bacon. It could also save the life of an unsuspecting family member who accidentally contacts the trigger for whatever reason. We recommend reading the OSHA guide to chainsaw safety ( 7 ) if you’ve never used a chainsaw before. What are the Warning Signs of a Dull Chain? Even the sharpest, highest-quality chainsaw chain will become dull over time. Here are some warning signs that the chain needs sharpening or replacing ( 8 ): You need to physically push the saw into the wood when making a cut. With a sharp chain you would feel the saw being pulled into the wood. The chain pulls to one side creating a crooked cut. This is normally a sign that the teeth on one side of the chain have become dull. The cutting action is not smooth. Instead the saw rattles and shakes as it cuts through the wood. You see smoke coming from the cut even though the saw should be handling it with ease. The Bottom Line The best chain saws are incredible tools that make short work of difficult jobs. But they’re not toys and not all are created equal. You should never purchase a chainsaw based solely on price. Instead you should weigh the reasons you need it, how you plan to use it and how frequently you think you’ll be using it. You should also consider which type of power is right for your purposes. And don’t forget to make sure your chainsaw comes with some basic safety features. If you can get an inexpensive chainsaw that meets all your criteria, great. But don’t buy one simply because it’s cheap.

Most Powerful Handgun in the World A Shot at the Top

Most Powerful Handgun in the World  A Shot at the Top

To keep and bear arms is the right to defend yourself, they say. These handguns reinforce that principle. However, they are not reduced in design only to incapacitate or kill. They do so with impressive force, one to be reckoned with. It’s all about breaking records. So what is the most powerful handgun in the world? To that extent, we created a bulletproof list of top ten most powerful handguns. Get locked and loaded, and stick to the end of this coronation ceremony. What is the most powerful handgun out there? 1. The Smith &; Wesson .44 Magnum ‘A man’s got to know his limitations’ , but this gun does not. A hand cannon in the right hands, the .44 Remington Magnum first hit the stage in the 1970s. It was launched into instant fame by Dirty Harry , the vigilante cop played by Clint Eastwood. In the movie series, it was the only partner to keep up the pace with rule-bender Inspector Callahan in scrubbing the streets clean of criminals. The most powerful handgun out there, the Magnum. A bullet-spitting monster whose accompanying equipment, the shoulder slings and bipods only attest to its power. This gun fires big and fast enough bullets. It would be better suited for game up to elk and even elephant size than proper police weaponry. For some, simple ownership of this large caliber handgun is enough. Particularly since shooting it may prove a little bit of a strain on the hands. Unless, of course, your name is Dirty Harry. 2. The Desert Eagle .50 Caliber It’s known for chambering the largest cartridge of any gas-operated, semi-automatic handgun. "The Desert Eagle" is about as powerful as a self-loading pistol can get. This most powerful handgun holds a unique design with a huge muzzle and a triangular barrel. It can fire up to 7 rounds of .50 A.E ammunition. Furthermore, the bullet exit is protected from too much wear and tear by a special technique used in the bore. With great size comes high recoil. As such, the Desert Eagle is said to be much better suited for the outdoor than close-range shooting or home defense setting. Developed by Magnum Research and refined by Israeli Military Industries which also produced the similar Jericho 941, or Baby Eagle, the handgun blasted the market in the 1980s. The echoes ring to this day. It was developed by Magnum Research and refined by "Israeli Military Industries" . They also were the ones behind the similar Jericho 941, or Baby Eagle. The Magnum handgun blasted the market in the 1980s. The echoes are heard to this day. Hollywood marketed it in motion pictures like Predator, Snatch, and Lock, Stock and Two Smoking Barrels, Deadpool . Still, the Desert Eagle punched holes even in video games like Resident Evil, Tomb Raider, Call of Duty and Far Cry. 3. The Linebaugh .500 Wyoming-based gunsmith John Linebaugh had been searching all his life for the most powerful cartridge. He first took his shot at converting Ruger and Seville sixguns into five-shooters. While that proved successful, it was the .500 Linebaugh that hit the target. 40 years later, Linebaugh’s signature gun is still a big shot. It’s now claiming the title for one of the most powerful handgun cartridges, pushing heavy bullets at tremendous speed. The firearm can launch a 29g bullet at a velocity of 400 m/s while generating 2.240J of energy. Initially, the design was for a hunting cartridge. However, you can also use the .500 Linebaugh as a backup arm in the wilderness of Alaska, where large bears roam. It still remains the ultimate portable weaponry easily packable. 4. The Colt Single Action Army Revolver Meet the ‘ Peacemaker ’, ‘ The Gun that Won the West ’, the ‘ Great Equalizer ’, the Colt SAAA . No other gun bears as many names and as much history as this famous piece of Americana. Here’s the rugged and robust single-action Colt Army Revolver. A requisition of the US Army by Samuel Colt, it became standard military service revolver until 1892. The Colt SAA has remained faithful to its original face. The solid frame, the case hardened finish, and the seven and a half barrel make it a polished beauty of the 19 th century. The manufacturer has interrupted production twice, but the Colt kept coming hard on the scene due to popular demand. It used to be a favorite among lawmen and outlaws alike. However, it’s since switched hands to cinema cowboys, re-enactors, and collectors. The word on the street is that God created all men, but Samuel Colt made them equal. 5. The Pfeifer-Zeliska Handgun It’s similar in loading and loosely inspired by the previously mentioned "Colt Single Action" cowboy gun. The Zeliska is one of the most powerful handguns out there, hurling a muzzle energy of 7.591-foot pounds in a display of brutal force. Not only that, but this handgun is a contender for the heavyweight category as well. It weighs an outstanding 6.001 kilograms/ 13.230 pounds. The cylinder alone tips the scales at more than 4 pounds and measures 55 centimeters/ 22in in length. Produced by Pfeifer firearms, this Austrian revolver looms so big, you might think it’s a Hollywood prop. Even more so with such added features as a hammer plated in gold, and cylinder pivot and action. Each .600 Nitro Express bullet costs nearly $40. 6. The Walther Pistols The Polizeipistole series of double action semi-automatic pistols was first developed by German arms manufacturer Walther for the European police force in the 1930s. It features a cool title and a stylishly simple design. Safety features like the automatic hammer block or the indicator pointing to a loaded chamber were innovations at the time, and sparked worldwide inspiration, prompting gun manufacturers to unload an assault of legendary firearms like the Hungarian FEG PA-63 , the Soviet Makarov , or the Argentinian Bersa thunder 380 . This handgun’s reliability and chameleonic design are its other much-appreciated features, and come packaged with an exposed hammer, a fixed barrel and a single column magazine. It’s certainly a contender for the title of most powerful handgun. While the recoil is high, the decoder assists in the safety drop, after you depress the hammer, so the Walther pistols are not only one of the most powerful handguns in the world, they’re also a universal match for any hand size out there. 7. The Tokarev If the Walther is Gestapo’s weapon of choice, the Tokarev was designed in the millions to arm the communist secret police, the European countries on the other side of the block and other Soviet satellite states like Pakistan and China. This handgun is the ultimate collectible, but since it was mass produced, it now sells on the surplus market at a price that is more than affordable. The bottleneck cartridge, which in fact is an upgraded Russian version of the 7.63x25mm Mauser, is less prone to jamming and has greater penetration. In tests, it proved to be armor-piercing and defeated lighter ballistic vests with ease, while also denting the sturdier Kevlar helmets. Although somewhat of a rugged relic, the Tokarev still remains a reliable pistol and one of the most powerful handguns in the world. 8. The Browning Hi-Power Pistol This state of the art handgun was commissioned to American firearms inventor John Browning by a sidearm service for The French Military, the Grande Puissance . Translated to ‘High Power’, the name stuck to the gun. It was, in fact, the last Browning designed. Among the requirements, the French asked for the arm to be compact, simple to re-assemble, capable of hitting a target at 50 meters, and endowed with a positive safety and magazine capacity of at least 10 rounds. This pretty much describes the Browning Hi-Power Pistol, certainly the most powerful handgun to fall in French hands. The name also gives testimony to the present 13-round magazine capacity. At the time of its conception, it was unrivaled and introduced in more than 50 countries. When the Belgians bought the patent, they unimaginatively renamed it P-35. 9. The M1911 Another Browning design, this 1911 pistol is the sweetheart of handguns, as much as a pistol can ever be loved. Going by the affectionate name ‘ The Yankee Fist ’, this single-action, semi-automatic, recoil operated pistol served a full 75 years in the line of fire as the standard-issue sidearm for the United States Armed Forces. Not only did the M1911 shoot its way to the top of the most steel-solid and powerful handguns in the world, but it was among the first to introduce the short recoil principle in the pre-WW1 USA. 10. The Smith & Wesson .500 firearm Some of the most powerful handguns in the world shoot above and beyond the requirements, and the Smith & Wesson .500 is there to claim the throne. If what you want is a display of sheer force and brutal power, and you’re still not convinced by our previous nine most powerful handguns, this .50-caliber has a deadly punch to do the trick. Its record-breaking power? The model .500 can fire a bullet weighing 350 gr. at 602 m/s with a generated muzzle energy of over 3.030 foot-pounds. Fired up yet? These are not your average firearms. They’re the most powerful handguns in the world, and should only be reserved for situations in which you either have to fight an apocalypse of zombies, defend yourself from the attack of a mad Revenant-epic grizzly bear or take down alien aircraft. Image sources: 1 , 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 , 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 , 10

Best Affordable Full-Sized Pistols for Under $400

Best Affordable Full-Sized Pistols for Under $400

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s There are new guns entering the market all of the time, some good…some not so good.  And what if you’re not Mr. Moneybags? You don’t need McDuck’s gold to get a good pistol! The question is how do you make your decision?  Unfortunately, newbies have to survive contact with gun snobs who will tell you what their favorite sidearm is, whether you ask or not, and then tell you that if you don’t have what they have you are probably going to get killed when the zombies come. If you are new to guns, you’ll want to review our Beginner’s Guide to Guns and brush up on the Four Rules of Gun Safety Patriot Patch Co A major consideration is cost; it can even become the most powerful influence on the type of gun you will purchase.  In choosing a handgun there are several criteria that I believe are the most important. Reliability- If you are considering your handgun for a nightstand gun anything less than 100% is unacceptable. Accuracy- A self-defense pistol should be able to keep bullets in the 9 zone of a B 27 target. Ergonomics- You won’t shoot a gun well if it doesn’t fit your hand. Accessories – Aftermarket support is crucial for a good self-defense pistol. Value- This can be the most important factor on the type of pistol you choose or even if you purchase a pistol at all. Okay – now that we’ve established what I believe is the most important factors, I will present to you what I believe are some of the finest and most economical firearms on the market. They are all full sized pistols and have barrels of at least 4 inches or more.  They have polymer frames and because of their size, they will be easier to shoot than a mid-sized or compact pistol. I will rate each category on a scale of 1-5 based on these criteria.  However, it is still up to you to determine what is best for you and not buddy the gun shop troll. Best Full-Sized Pistols For Under $400 1. Canik TP9SA Since this Turkish pistol made it to the US in 2014, it has been stirring up a lot of trouble for its competitors.  Initially, it was marketed as a Walther P99 knock off but it soon became apparent that Canik looked at hanging around in the US marketplace for a long time. Best Overall Rating CANIK - TP9SA 388 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 388 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Listening to the American people has allowed Canik to make adjustments to these handguns that make them a solid choice at any price.  There are tons of reviews of them on the internet but I will give you a brief rating of this pistol. Reliability 5/5 Based on the opinion of people I trust, this gun seems rock solid when it comes to reliability.  Although I have never owned one, my friends give it thumbs up for its reliability.  I have heard of thousands of rounds without a failure. Accuracy 4/5 My requirements for a defensive pistol is that it stays on a pie plate at 15 yards and this firearm will easily do that and then some. Ergonomics 5/5 This gun feels good in the hand and it comes with two back straps to ensure that it is adjustable to fit the average to above average sized mitts. Accessories 3/5 There is not that much product support for this model in the US market but that’s not a big issue because of the accessories that come with the gun itself (holster, back straps, holster, magazine loader and two magazines.  You can find holsters for the gun because some M&P magazines seem to fit it.  It has been said that it will accept some CZ sights. Value-5/5 This pistol is a gem.  With an MSRP of only 399 with a street price that is considerably less than that this gun is a prime choice for a new gun owner.  It’s a budget-priced handgun with above average build quality. Overall rating 4.4/5 With an average of 4.4 out of 5 rating, this gun is an excellent choice.  What’s your take? Readers' Ratings 4.94/5 (413) Your Rating? 2. Polymer Witness EAA has been importing this CZ variant in this country since the 1980’s.  The demand was fueled when Colonel Jeff Cooper declared the CZ75 a “wonder nine” but the American public was unable to legally purchase one. EAA responded with the Witness pistol and it has had a lot of success in the United States.  The polymer Witness was introduced in 1997 and has been an excellent value. EAA Polymer Witness I realize that striker fired guns are the rage right now but this is a precision weapon that can be purchased for a fraction of the cost of most polymer self-defense pistols Reliability 5/5 This gun is very reliable.  I can remember a variant of this model going through the entire ESI firearms training course without one bobble.  To be noted, I saw a Glock and an S&W fail during Accuracy 5/5 Built with the same type of frame as a CZ 75, I just knew this was going to be a winner.  I went to the range to wring out his Witness, which is in 10mm; the gun was literally the most accurate gun I have ever shot.  I literally fired two full magazines into a quarter at 15 yards. Ergonomics 4/5 The only reason this gun is getting this rating is that there is no provision to adjust the grip for people that hands don’t fit the Witness.  It does fit the average hand and if it feels good to you I would go for it. Accessories 3/5 There is not a lot of options out there for the Witness.  You can find holsters and other accessories by looking at those companies that provide parts to the CZ 75, sometimes you can get lucky. Value 5/5 Even though the Witness only comes with one magazine, that doesn’t stop this from being an amazing value. Overall score 4.4/5 It shares the score of 4.4 with the Canik and is an excellent alternative to buying a striker fired guns, hey I like hammers. 3. S&W SD9VE Everyone knows the big brother of the SD but few people realize the outstanding value this gun holds in its own right.  This value-priced pistol was introduced to the public in 2012. Best Workhorse S&W SD9VE 330 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 330 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing The stepchild of the Sigma the SD corrected every issue that its parent had.  The SD is a pistol that sits in the hand comfortably and just plain work.  When I purchase one it was the butt of many jokes on the internet but now I believe the public recognizes it for the value that it is. The SD is the same size as the heralded Glock 19.  It is a very light shooting alternative to the more expensive firearms. Reliability 5/5 The SD I owned had gone through many boxes of practice and self-defense ammo without so much as a hiccup. Accuracy 4/5 This gun has good accuracy.  It is a soft shooting pistol that will serve its owner for many years. Ergonomics 4/5 There is no ability to adjust the grip for different users but this gun sits low in the hand and the grip angle feels so good. Accessories 2/5 There are not a lot of accessories for this pistol.  The ones that are available actually developed for the big brother the M&P.  There are some holsters available for purchase that claim they are able to fit the SD but most will fit the generic Uncle Mikes types of Cordura holsters.  If you select this one, I would have my holster custom made. Value 5/5 The SD is the king of value.  It is a nice solid gun with good customer support. Overall rating 3.8/5 With the ability to switch out the polymer sights it came with to get the M&P sights or the steel guide rods.  This gun is a winner with the rebate you could probably buy two of these without breaking the bank.  I give it a 3.8.  If you purchase this pistol it will provide you with great service over many years. 4. Ruger American The Ruger American is the biggest value in the country when it comes to a full-sized service pistol.  Designed to compete in the latest battery of tests for the new US military contract it has features that no other pistol has on the market. Most Versatile Ruger American 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 450 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing After it lost in the trials, the gun made it to the market in 2015 and it never looked back.  Just putting this gun in your hands you can feel the quality. In Ruger tradition, it is an incredible value.  It features a heavier frame, low recoil barrel cam system, and authentic Novak sights. Reliability 5/5 The Ruger is indeed a remarkable firearm.  I have run over a 1000 rounds through it so far without one failure to eject or failure to fire.  I give it 5/5 for its monotonous habit of always working. Accuracy  5/5 For me the Ruger American is very accurate.  It points well and its weight ensures that you are able to stay on target.  I use a deck of cards with my targets to make both my students and myself focus I can shoot with my American 2” groups at 15 yards and that is excellent for me.  It has a very good trigger that breaks in the neighborhood of 6 lbs.  and it is not too light not too but just right. Ergonomics 5/5 I have heard many people say that they have had issues with the frame pressing into the web of their hand when they shoot but that was not my experience.  Ruger also made the pistol completely ambidextrous so lefties can use this pistol without having to adjust.  When you also consider that they have interchangeable backstraps, you can see that they thought of it all. Accessories 1/5 If there is anywhere that this pistol needs assistance it would be in market support.  Being relatively new, there are not that many parts out there for this pistol.  You are somewhat limited to generic holsters and other parts but as the gun becomes more popular I am convinced that this will change. Value 5/5 This is where the Ruger shines.  With an MSRP of 579 but a street retail of 339, this is one of the most economical modern combat pistols available to the public.  The Ruger comes in a hard case with 2 magazines (17 rd. Teflon coated), 2 interchangeable back straps, a wrench and a lock. Overall rating 4.2/5 With an overall rating of 4.2, the Ruger is an exceptional value with its ambidextrous features, steel Novak sights,  interchangeable backstraps, removable chassis and special recoil reducing cam along with a bargain basement price I believe it’s the best deal out there right now. 5. Walther Creed The Creed looks like the illegitimate child of a PPX and a PPQ.  Several years ago, I owned a PPX.  It looked blocky and there were plenty of jokes about how similar it looked a highpoint but there was no mistaking the Walther quality and craftsmanship. Walther Creed 350 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 350 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing When the gun got into your hands that’s where it shined.  The gun did ok but there were some complaints.  Walther did their best to address these complaints and the result is the Creed. The Creed is hammer fired which makes it unique as a polymer pistol but it has a very smooth trigger pull that comes in around 6 lbs. but feels lighter. Reliability 5/5 With Walther’s craftsmanship evident, it’s no surprise that this pistol is reliable.  In the time period that I had mine, it never malfunctioned and I trusted it with my life. Accuracy 3/5 While it wasn’t the best performer in my hands, it certainly has enough accuracy to be an excellent nightstand gun and large enough to make shooting several hundred round fatigue free. Ergonomics 3/5 It fit my hand fine but that crazy little hump on the back strap is not for everyone.  Also without provisions to adjust the grip or its angle it is a roll of the dice for the new buyer. Accessories 1/5 As of this moment, there aren’t any accessories that I can think of for this gun.  There are a few companies like DeSantis and Alien gear that make holsters for this pistol.  Also because the demand is increasing, you can be sure that there are manufacturers looking at how they can provide parts for this pistol. Value 5/5 With an MSRP of 399 and a street price which is actually around 339, this gun is priced to move.  Who would have thought that you could get Walther quality for less than 400? Overall rating 3.4/5 The Walther Creed is an excellent firearm for a new owner, don’t let the rating of 3.4 fool you.  It has the quality of a much more expensive pistol and very decent accuracy.  Also for people that like hammers, it’s one of the few options available on the market.  If you only have the finances to get one gun this would be an excellent choice. Honorable Mention 6. Taurus G2C Okay, technically this isn’t a full-sized gun. But it is a great option for CCW and HD. If you’re really on a budget then you need to give the Taurus G2C a close look! It’s about the size of a Sig P365, it’s double-stack 12+1, and it is VERY reliable. Taurus G2C 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 220 at Brownells Prices accurate at time of writing Johnny did a complete hands-on review and video of it and gave it a raving good rating! Reliability: 5/5 I’ve seen other reviewers have some minimal trouble from the G2C, but my sample size of one is a friggen’ TANK. It’s unstoppable. Ergonomics: 4/5 I wish I could grip a little higher on the frame, but the texture is great and the angle is fine. The safety lever is as well-placed as any gun on the market. Accuracy: 4/5 That crunchy trigger will do you no favors at the range, but overall the accuracy is fine. You can put shots on a torso target no sweat. Customization: 2/5 Add whatever light you want to the rail, but the options get thin after that. Value: 5/5 A reliable concealed carry pistol under $250? Name me a better value. Overall: 4/5 Conclusions I am encouraged by what I see taking place in the firearms industry.  There is a trend of developing new designs that are more user-friendly, which appeals to the average person. The new standard of a defensive pistol is lighter, simpler, more rugged and accurate than the firearms of my past.  The market dictates that they be economical because of the competition.  This is all good news for the new firearm owner and particularly so for those that are interested in a good service pistol for home defense or even for competition. The list of guns in the previous paragraphs all have one particular thing in common and that is that they are all reliable.  Throw in the fact that they cost under 400 and they all are gems. My suggestion is that if you are serious about choosing a full sized pistol for defense, it would be in your best interest to go to your nearest firearm retailer and handle these pistols. Go to a local range and rent one because that is the only way you will find out what works for you.  Until next time always remember to check your six. Read up on other great pistols in our Best Pistols for Beginners & Home Defense . Have one of these already? Have another good pistol to add to the list? Let me know in the comments! Then check out our Best CCW Guns Under $400 .

[Review] CMMG 5.7x28MM Upper: Resolute 300 MK57

[Review] CMMG 5.7x28MM Upper: Resolute 300 MK57

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s CMMG, known for their good looks and guns that run like scalded dogs has jumped into the 5.7x28mm conversion game. I recently added a complete 5.7 upper to my current CMMG Resolute 300 rifle, got a boatload of expensive ammo down the pipe, and I’m going to tell you all about it. CMMG 5.7x28mm By the end, you’ll hopefully know if you need to convert your favorite AR to a 5.7 and bring all the boys to the yard. I also did a full video review, here it is from my channel ! Table of Contents Loading... 5.7x28MM? Back in the 90s, FN created this bottleneck round as a potential replacement for the 9MM (yeah, LOL, we know) and to win a whopper of a NATO contract. 5.7 FN Round The 5.7×28 round was born. Federal American Eagle 5.7x28mm 40 Grain TMJ 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing But until recently it was mostly limited to the FN 5.7 pistol and the FN P90. The round has continued to gain traction, and here we are. Bottom line, it’s a small round with big velocity. The Conversion CMMG does make smaller 5.7 conversions, down to the 5” Banshee, but I wanted the big boy. I got the Resolute 300 MK57 upper . It has a 16.1” 416SS barrel, forged receiver, CMMG handguard, and an ambi-charging handle that I genuinely like. CMMG taking a nap The brake is CMMG’s SV. Price as I tested is $925.00, which comes in a black hard coat finish. I went with the upgraded midnight bronze Cerakote finish because reasons. Yo, Mr. White, Science! The heart of this upper, as well as a huge chunk of CMMG’s lineup, is the patented “radial delayed blowback” system. After the gun goes pow, the BCG has a slight pause in travel as it rotates just a wiggle. That delay allows a few extra nanoseconds for more gas to get down the pipe. The result is less perceived recoil and better performance when running suppressed. End of science lesson. The Mailbox What it comes with is a complete upper inside a cardboard box. Easy. Cool thing is, it can ship right to your door. No FFL transfer needed. The not cool thing is buying ammo. More on that below. The Fit The complete upper can go on any standard AR lower. Again, I paired this with my current CMMG Resolute lower and the fit was perfect. CMMG Resolute Lower Out of the box. Slap it on the lower. And straight to the range. The Optic For this initial range review, I paired the Resolute with a Leupold Freedom RDS . Leupold Freedom looks good too! This was my first go with the 1x red dot, but my initial impression is solid. It’s built like a tank. Leupold Freedom RDS 300 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 300 at Amazon Prices accurate at time of writing It has a crystal clear view. And the controls are easy. So far, so good. If you like other stuff…check out our Best Red Dots article for more. The Mags CMMG has created proprietary mags for their AR conversions. They hold 40 rounds which makes me yell ‘MERICA at the range. 40-round magazines, like the founding fathers intended! The mags fit regular AR-15 mag wells, and I had zero issues with the mags at the range. The Range After adding the optic, all I did was oil the BCG and then let ‘er rip. I used "Federal American Eagle" 40 grain rounds, because they are cheaper than the standard FN ammo. Range days are always good I did mag dumps at short and medium distances, and I don’t have much to report. Zero issues with feeding, ejecting, and locking back on empty. The gun runs. Accuracy The 5.7 round has a solid reputation for accuracy.  There is decades of data out there, so I was not worried about getting on target. I drove nails at 50 yards, literally stacking rounds, which is good news. But I am left with wondering how the longer barrel affects the velocity, compared to the 5.7 round in a pistol? Hopefully someone in a lab coat does a test. The Feel Weirdest thing about this test is that the setup is clearly an AR-15. So in my head, I was expecting an AR-15 type experience. Nope. That radial delayed blowback just eats the little pistol round. It is the lightest PCC I have ever worked with, which translates to an enjoyable and somewhat quiet day at the range. Nice to shoot without the neighbors cussing me because of noise. Why the 5.7? With Ruger’s new release of their 5.7 pistols, and CMMG coming hard into the paint with their lineup, I think we are going to see a surge in popularity for the round. Folks are using these for home defense SBRs and as fun guns at the range. And it certainly is fun to mix things up. But my primary purpose is varmint hunting. RIP East Tennessee groundhogs in the coming days. The Good So if you made it this far, you know this range test went fantastic. The gun runs, and spoiler alert…big thumbs up from me. The finish is gorgeous, and the features are solid. Other than maybe adding a suppressor, there’s literally nothing else to be done to this upper. My favorite is the CMMG “lifetime quality guarantee.” Makes me sleep better. The Bad Ok, we need to talk about ammo prices. Right now FN ammo is 60-65 cents per pop. Thankfully Federal has jumped into the game and if you dig around online, you can get down to 45-50 cents per round. But expect to pay $20 or so every time you load up a forty-round mag. Federal American Eagle 5.7x28mm 40 Grain TMJ 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 27 at Lucky Gunner Prices accurate at time of writing My big hope is that the popularity of the round right now will drive those prices down a bit. By the Numbers Reliability 5/5 Sample size of one, but I couldn’t make this upper not run. Ergonomics 4/5 It feels like an AR. The handguard feels familiar, and the CMMG charging handle is solid. Accuracy 4/5 It will put rounds where you tell them to go. Customization 5/5 I guess these 5 points really go to Eugene Stoner. It’s an AR. Change anything your heart desires. Value 5/5 CMMGs offerings don’t come at bargain-basement prices. But if you “buy once, cry once” the end result is a premier product. No upgrades needed. Overall 4.5/5 There’s really not much to complain about with the 5.7 upper. Solid value in a mega-fun chambering. Conclusion The CMMG Resolute 300 MK57 in the glorious 5.7x28mm cartridge is reliable, stacks rounds on top of each other, and gives you the familiar AR-15 controls. It’s not a bargain but you likely won’t need any upgrades besides adding a quality optic. It got my attention from day one, and overall I had a ball. The upper runs. The mags run. I’m in. What do you think about the 5.7x28mm cartridge? Will the new Ruger and CMMG help fuel a comeback for this little round? Let us know in the comments! If you want to look at the classic gat that started it all, take a look at our review of the FN Five-seveN ! Five-SeveN with 5.7x28mm Ammo and 20 Round Magazine

Kimber Has Evolved the Revolver: K6S Range Report

The Kimber K6s revolver is designed for high performance concealed carry. With 6 rounds of .357 Magnum or .38 Special, K6s compact revolvers provide a small package with mild recoil and the power needed for concealed carry, back-up or home protection. The Kimber K6s’ small frame, two-inch barrel and 1.39 inch diameter cylinder are machined from stainless steel for superior integrity, strength, and resistance to the elements. The Kimber K6s offers other important design features, such as: a smooth match-grade trigger that creates confidence while helps ensure accuracy; an internal hammer and edges that are rounded and blended to help prevent a hang up when the revolver is removed from concealment; superior ergonomics and grip design that creates an extremely shooter-friendly experience; and an all stainless steel construction weighing in at 23 ounces. fnfalguy over at Glocktalk has written a great range report and given us permission to share it. After much hemming and hawing, I bought a K6S sight unseen. Don’t know why I decided to take a chance but I did. I never cared for Kimber M1911s and I thought that their rifles are just okay. Nonetheless this K6S looks funky and reviews were good, so I took a chance. The gun came with a soft case AND a speed strip. I thought that the speed strip was a nice touch. At first blush, the fit and finish are pretty good. Not great but pretty good. I dinged it for the brushed finish that while handsome, was not evenly finished. Better than a Ruger finish but that doesn’t say much at all. Trigger pull is heavy. This isn’t a several hundred rounds session gun. It will wear your trigger finger out. However, it is smooth. Very smooth. The radiused trigger face also is a nice touch for quick DA work. It also stage-able like a Colt DA pull. Good or bad, depends on who you ask. You can pull it straight through and it will work just fine. Or you can stage it for the longer shots. Since that I’m a Colt wheelgun dude, I like stage-able DA pull. Very well defined sights. So nice to see snubbies with workable sights. The Ruger LCR’s sights are also nice. The push button for cylinder release is positive as well. Easier to activate than on a Ruger. The grip is comfortable and well shaped for my hand. It’s just too sticky for my CCW preference. I’ll get me a set of wooden grips to replace it soon enough. I really don’t understand Smith & Wesson, Ruger and now Kimber and Colt putting rubber grips on CCW wheelguns. Yes, they’re more comfortable to shoot but these guns aren’t meant for “comfortable” shooting. They’re meant for concealed carry and that means smallish and smooth grips (wood, micarta or whatever). But for those who don’t want to CCW it and think of it as a woods gun, then the rubber grip is fine. Recessed charge holes is a nice feature. As is the radiused muzzle. Overall, a nice package. I’ve seen street prices on these suckers dipping into the $750 range. Might as well jump right in and say that this gun SHOOTS GREAT!!! I was most pleasantly surprised. Most pleasantly surprised, indeed. I really didn’t know what to expect of this wheelgun. But if all the other K6Ses are like mine, then I think that a revolver enthusiast should own at least one just for kicks. I’ll let the photos speak for themselves. I think that the first two groups at 7-yds were suffering from my flinching due to the various DA misfiring issues with the Colt Diamondback. Nonetheless, as I started to get used to the feel of the Kimber’s trigger pulls and handling characteristics, the groups started to shrink at 10-yrds. I don’t know about others, but I shoot best with the K6S while using the Weaver stand. I think that I overheard some snickers with the Joe Cools shooting at the next stalls because of my antiquated shooting stance…until I rolled the target back and started taping up the holes. A young gent to my right remarked, “I didn’t think those little revolvers can shoot tight like that.” I gave him the “aw-shuck-that-ain’t-nuthin'” look. Next up were my typical rapid fire drills: One caveat for the people with big hands and long fingers, you guys and gals might be playing bumbling fingers with this gun, possibly more than the Ruger LCR – but then the LCR has the big ass grip. There’s not a lot of room for the fingers. At this point I’m still shooting .38 Special, and with minimal recoil from the .38 load one can actually short stroke the DA pull by going a wee bit fast. That explained my two misses at 7-yds. That’s what happened when you try to show off to the youths. I ran out of .38 Special at this point and get ready to break out the .357 Magnum box because after all, the gun’s barrel is marked with .357 Magnum and not .38 Special. The Blazer Brass 158-gr JHP .357 Mag is definitely a handful with this little sucker. It’s manageable but just barely. Oh yeah, the palm definitely feels it!!! Not to mention the fireball and the cryin’ chillen. Oh Yeah, Mr. Magnum asserted himself with Authoritay!!! The flinch from bad DA firing with the Diamondback is long gone and now replaced with good old genuine SHAKE. The Kimber snarls and spits like a raging dragon. I was tempted to yell out, “Drakarish” Or whatever the heck Danaerys Stormborn said to make her dragons start spitting fire and roasting people. At this point I pussed out and just wanted to finish off the box of .357 without crying like a little girl. So I did a couple of groups of one-handed shooting. Yeah, it’s that bad. In summary, I was most glad that I took the chance and bought this bad mamajama. I don’t even know if I’m going to CCW it. It’s a hefty sucker at 23-ounces empty. Not to mention, I would have stoked it with .38 Spl +P, which I would have done in the other snubbies like Ruger LCR, various J-frames or Colt D-frames anyway. One thing for sure though, the K6S weighs about the same as the Ruger SP101 but it feels a lot better balanced. More like a lean, mean machine than a hunk of steel. It’d probably make a good woods gun. My GP100 Wiley Clapp with the 3″ barrel is a lot bigger and heavier than the K6S, and I can see the K6S taking over boondocks duty from the Wiley Clapp . For those who prefer to stoke these snubbies with .357 Mag as CCW, I say go for it. I think that it’s better than the SP101 and SW 640. Can you dig it? Photos by fnfalguy on Glocktalk

Glock 19 vs. 26: I Love the G19, But Which is Better For CCW?

Oh dear. I just know that, 5 minutes after posting this review, I’m going to get some angry emails from people who disagree with me. Though other notable battles between compact pistols – think the Glock 43 vs. Shield – divide opinion, it seems that the most combative arguments are between people who disagree about which Glock is best. Today, I’m going to take a look at both the Glock 19 and the 26, and compare them. Though both are great guns, there are some differences in terms of performance and size between these two guns that can have a big impact for individual shooters. In my humble opinion – spoiler alert – the Glock 19 is the better weapon. I know that a lot of people prefer to carry the lighter 26, but for me the difference in weight between the two guns is not a huge problem. Instead, and since I’m a firm believer in carrying the biggest gun that suits the situation, the extra capacity of the 19 gives it the edge. In addition, the Glock 19 is just about big enough to be pressed into service as a full-sized service pistol. This means that getting a Glock 19 essentially means you are getting two pistols for the price of one – a compact concealed weapon, but also one large enough to shoot accurately with. Below, I’ll explain my thinking by comparing these guns in a number of key categories. First, though, a bit of history. Until the release of the Glock 43 in 2005, the 26 was the smallest weapon they made . Designed to take advantage of the increasing popularity of concealed carry, the major focus of the design of the 26 was to make it as small as possible. Glock certainly achieved this, but also made the 26 capable of accepting magazines from larger pistols, simultaneously increasing ammunition capacity and grip length. The Glock 19 has been around for years now , and was always envisaged to be a more adaptable gun. Large enough to be considered by law enforcement professionals as a serious back-up weapon, it is also slightly smaller than the Glock 19, and therefore more easily concealed. But which is better, I here you ask? Well, let’s find out, albeit with the following warning – the opinions here are my own, and of course no review can ever recommend the perfect gun for you. If you possibly can, fire both of these weapons, and see what works for you. Today, though, I’ll take you through the key points of difference, so that you can make your own mind up about the best gun for you. @import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Open+Sans:400,700&subset=latin");@import url("//fonts.googleapis.com/css?family=Lato:300,700,400&subset=latin");@media (min-width: 300px){[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { border: none; background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; margin-top: 0px !important; padding: 0px !important; background-color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; background-color: rgb(242, 237, 237) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { margin-top: -10px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 15px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { line-height: 1.1em !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-family: inherit !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; font-size: 17px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { line-height: 1em !important; }[data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] strong { font-weight: 700; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-family: Lato; font-weight: 400; font-size: 25px !important; color: rgb(5, 5, 5) !important; }[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { padding-top: 0px !important; background-image: none !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; text-align: center; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 0px 0px 20px !important; background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-35bd34974a14d8"] { max-width: 760px; min-height: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { margin-left: 0px; padding-top: 0px !important; padding-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] > .tcb-flex-col { padding-left: 0px; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { border: none; border-radius: 5px; overflow: hidden; padding: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 20px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-85bd34974a1604"] { width: 85px; float: none; margin: 0px auto !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] { color: rgb(255, 255, 255) !important; font-size: 16px !important; font-family: "Open Sans" !important; letter-spacing: 1px; font-weight: 400 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-135bd34974a173a"] { overflow: hidden; max-width: 330px; float: none; width: 100%; background-color: rgb(241, 89, 42) !important; border-radius: 5px !important; padding-top: 5px !important; padding-bottom: 5px !important; margin-left: auto !important; margin-right: auto !important; z-index: 3; position: relative; }[data-css="tve-u-145bd34974a1775"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] strong { font-weight: 700 !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] .tve-page-section-in { display: block; }}@media (max-width: 767px){[data-css="tve-u-75bd34974a15c8"] { text-align: center; background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-125bd34974a16fe"] { font-size: 22px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-05bd34974a141d"] { background-image: none !important; }[data-css="tve-u-25bd34974a149a"] { background-image: none !important; }:not(#tve) [data-css="tve-u-105bd34974a167c"] { font-size: 28px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-95bd34974a1640"] { background-image: none !important; padding-top: 10px !important; padding-bottom: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-55bd34974a1550"] { padding-top: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-45bd34974a1514"] { background-image: none !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-15bd34974a145e"] { padding-bottom: 20px !important; margin-bottom: 0px !important; padding-left: 10px !important; padding-right: 10px !important; }[data-css="tve-u-115bd34974a16b9"] { padding: 10px 0px !important; background-image: none !important; }} .tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_heading h3{margin:0;padding:0}.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element p,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h1,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h2,.tve-leads-conversion-object .thrv_text_element h3{margin:0} Get Deals on Guns and Tactical Gear Join 70,000 Readers For Our Weekly Discounts ​ GET MY DISCOUNTS Table of Contents 1 The Critical Question – Concealment 2 Cost 3 But Which is Better? 4 Final Thoughts "The Critical Question" – Concealment Let’s start by having a look, in detail, at the most commonly argued about difference between these two guns – their size, and by extension how easy they are to conceal. The Glock 26 is the smaller weapon . When it was released in 1995, it was Glock’s first entry in the then new category of sub-compact handguns. The barrel, in comparison to earlier Glocks, was made significantly shorter, and the grip drastically cut down to just a two-finger affair. Theoretically, this makes the 26 far easier to conceal than the Glock 19 . However, in reality concealment is quite a complicated business, and your ability to hide any pistol is more reliant on what kind of holster you use and what clothes you are wearing than it is on the size of the gun itself. The smaller 26 can be carried in a pocket holster, and if this is your preferred style of concealment than it is the sensible option here. However, I also think that most people will not have a problem concealing the Glock 19. It is larger, certainly, but the barrel is still pretty short in comparison to other handguns. Get a good concealment holster, and wear clothes that don’t allow the gun to print, and you shouldn’t have a problem. Once you recognize that the Glock 19 can also be concealed in most situations, it becomes by far the better gun. The performance offered by the 19 is higher than the 26 can ever achieve, and for this reason the 19 would be my choice. Cost In terms of price, there is not much to choose between these pistols. As Glocks, they are not cheap , but if you are relying on a pistol in a self-defense situation you don’t want to get the cheapest gun available anyway. Both of these guns can be picked up for under $500 , which is actually a bargain considering the quality of these pistols. If we have to compare, the 19 is actually slightly cheaper at the moment than its smaller cousin. Though you technically get “more” gun with 19, and therefore it represents the best value, in reality your choice of either the 19 or the 26 should be motivated more by the other factors I’m discussing here, and not the price. But Which is Better? With that in mind, let’s take a look at how these guns perform. We got brand new Glock 19s and 26s, went down the range, and fed them a variety of ammunition. Here are our thoughts on how they performed. Handling If you are used to shooting compact pistols , both of these weapons handle really well. Glock have built up quite a lot of experience making this kind of concealed-carry pistol, and so this should not come as a surprise. The Glock 26, despite its shorter grip and super-compact design, actually feels pretty good . It points well, and some of us were really surprised by how solid it feels in your hand. If you haven’t used this kind of two-finger grip before, it’s going to take some getting used, but unless you have enormously large hands it will feel natural after a few trips to the range. All that said, the Glock 19 is in a different league when it comes to handling . The extra finger on the grip makes all the difference to the way that this weapon feels. Not only does it give you extra control, but it also makes controlling the recoil of the weapon easier. And although the difference in weight between the two pistols – with the 19 weighing a bit more than the 26 – is noticeable when using them, in fact we preferred the extra heft of the 19. Accuracy Both of t hese weapons are very accurate for their type . All the usual warnings about accuracy apply here, in that your ability to hit a target is much more dependant on practice than the gun you are using. However, in our test both guns scored highly. The Glock 19 won . Having looked through a mountain of technical data for this review, I do not think, however, that this is due to any variation in “mechanical” accuracy between these two weapons. On paper, at least, they perform about the same in this regard. What made the difference was the extra control you get on the 19, due to the larger grip . In addition, it jumps around a lot less than the 26, especially in the hands of an experienced shooter. In terms of accuracy, then, I have to conclude that the 19 wins again. Recoil Well, that to say? If you are used to shooting large pistols , the recoil on both of these weapons is likely to take you by surprise. Since both are relatively compact, they lack the weight necessary to soak up recoil, and the Glock 26 in particular jumps around a lot. In terms of the differences between them, the 19 wins again . The tiny Glock 26 simply does not have enough weight to soak up recoil, and as a result putting powerful rounds through this weapon can be a real hassle unless you’ve been trained on how to control recoil. This fact actually reveals a strange paradox about the Glock 26. In a lot of places, you’ll see it recommended as a good weapon for women , because it is smaller, lighter, and easier to carry than Glock’s full-sized pistols. While it may fit in a handbag more easily, in truth it is really not suitable for weaker shooters, because the recoil will make it very inaccurate. In short – easy to carry, hard to shoot. Reliability Well, both of these guns are Glocks, and most of us know what that means when it comes to reliability. There are several reasons why Glock have won so many government contracts in Europe and elsewhere , and the reliability and ruggedness of their firearms is certainly one. In our tests, both guns fired all the crappy ammunition we fed them with no problems. The actions remained smooth throughout, and I’ve got no hesitations in recommending either gun in terms of reliability. Longer-term, both guns have been available for some time now, and both have got positive reviews from long-term users . The people we spoke to for this review praised, in particular, the Glock 19, which they said had given them many years of reliable service. I see no reason, on the other hand, why the Glock 26 should perform any worse – both are built to the same extremely high standard. Magazine Capacity Capacity is one area in which there is a real, measurable difference between the guns. The 26 can carry 10 rounds in the magazine, and 1 in the chamber. As standard, on the 19 you get 15 in the magazine and 1 in the chamber. Though there is a difference, this is still an impressive capacity for compact handguns. Compare the Glock 43 – with just 6 rounds in the mag as standard, easy to conceal – and you’ll see what I mean. Even the smaller 26 gives you 11 rounds, and if you can’t disable an attacker with that many bullets you need to practice more. To my mind, having 15 or 10 rounds in the mag makes very little difference, especially as you are likely to be carrying an extra magazine anyway. I know, however, that some people like to have as much ammunition as possible ready to go, and in this case I would recommend the 19. That said, it is just about possible to get the same capacity out of a 26. You can add after-market magazines which boost the mag capacity up to 15 rounds and beyond . For a lot of people, this is their reason to choose a 26 over a larger gun. The argument is that a 26 can “become” a larger weapon like the 19, but the 19 will never offer the concealment of a 26. Concealed Carry Finally, the ability to carry these pistols concealed. Again, in this area there appears to be a striking difference between the two guns. The shorter grip of the 26 means it prints less , and the fact that it is lighter could make it more comfortable to carry around. If you live in a hot part of the country, I suppose these arguments are worthwhile. However, where I live I do not find it difficult to conceal a Glock 19. The trick is to get a decent holster , and wear the correct clothing. I cannot talk for everyone, of course, but to my mind you shouldn’t choose a gun just based on how easy it is to hide. Of course, some people recommend getting both a 26 and a 19 – one for the summer, and one for the winter. If you have the cash, go for it! Final Thoughts So there you go. Both the Glock 19 and the 26 are great guns , and showcase what Glock can achieve in terms of compact and concealable firepower. Both are reasonably easy to use for experienced shooters, and both will give you many years of reliable service if you look after them. If I have to choose, however, I would always go for the Glock 19 . The extra ammunition capacity, the slightly larger grip, and the extra weight make this gun handle in a far superior way to its smaller rival. If you absolutely need to carry your weapon in deep concealment, go for the 26 . Otherwise, get the Glock 19 every time. Related Reads: Glock 17 VS. Glock 19 Glock 19 Gen 3 VS. Glock 19 Gen 4 Glock 19 VS. Sig Sauer P320 Glock 26 Shoulder Holsters Best Iwb Glock 26 Holsters 3.6/5 (10 Reviews) Will Ellis Hi there, I'm Will and I'll be your guide. Here at Gun News Daily, we support guns for self defense and and competitive shooting. We believe that America should be free and support the 2nd Amendment.

Summary

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